Tag Archives: stories

Finding More Meaningful Stories from Your Event Photos – Paperclipping 286

nutcracker_scrapbook
There was a time when my scrapbooking pages told the obvious stories.

If we went to the beach I scrapbooked about us at the beach. If we got together with extended family I scrapbooked about the event with extended family: who was there and what we did.

And that’s fine. I like looking back at the things we did.

But eventually I figured out how you and I can take control of our story-documenting and not let our calendar be the major deciding factor of how we tell our stories. I began to scrapbooking in a way that yields even more stories, and is especially meaningful.

A single event can provide an almost inexhaustible number of stories. And those stories are pieces of other larger macro-stories — themes running through our lives.

For example, photos from a date night could also become a story about…

  • your date nights habits in general
  • the personality of you as a couple
  • the types of restaurants you love
  • the night life of your city
  • your favorite friends to get with
  • your sense of fashion
  • taking Ubers there and back
  • your favorite drink
  • whether you and your date have the same interests or have to compromise

…Etc.

If you listened to our Deep Dive audio course with Shimelle Lain: The Story-Centered Album, then you’re familiar with my process of having story albums — albums that tell a story.

Story albums each tell a larger story into which you want to dive deeper. Those albums help me prioritize which stories I choose to spend my limited time scrapbooking; in which directions I lean as I look at an event with its photos and determine the deeper story threads that are subtly lurking.

So this week I printed some photos from last December’s Nutcracker Ballet, which my daughter danced in…but I bypassed her Nutcracker album.

Instead, I chose to tell stories with some of the Nutcracker photos that I will slip into other albums.

  • One of them is a layout about the opportunity to dance regularly in Phoenix’s beautiful historic theater, the Orpheum.
  • The other is a layout about myself, and it is related to some longtime threads of my own life: a change to my long life of performing on stage, as well as my life-long interest in volunteering.

orpheum_scrapbook

I am glad I was able to look beyond my daughter’s performance in the Nutcracker to see other, less obvious stories.

I decided to make this the topic of this week’s episode of Paperclipping.

Do you want to be identifying the more meaningful stories of your life from the basic events and photos?

If you’d like some help, be sure your membership is current.

CLICK HERE to start your membership.

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Ready to dive deeper into your stories and your scrapbooking?

Let’s do it. <3 IMG_8430

Writing for Better Story-Telling

During this week’s Paperclipping Roundtable on better writing I promised to share a layout in order to illustrate the writing tips we shared (I captioned it below).

This is an older page. It’s not perfect, amazing, brilliant writing, but it tells a good story. And it’s not just a story about what happened at an event, but it illustrates Aiden as a toddler, and me as a protective mother of a three-year-old.

Little Rascal
Journaling directed to Aiden reads:

During one of Blake’s baseball practices an older boy, about 7 years old, challenged you to a race. You agreed and off you went.

Of course, we couldn’t expect your little legs to keep up with him and he hit the finish line with the declaration, “I won!” long before you did.

Here I was, your protective mother, irritated that this 7-year-old boy was gloating about beating you, my three-year-old.

But then you reached the finish-line, still at a full pace and with a huge smile on your face. You began yelling, “I won! I won! I won! I won!”

Confidence.

The boy tried his best to convince you (and the rest of us!) that he beat you. But he couldn’t overcome your boisterous “I won!” celebrations. He was frustrated.

And I have never stopped smiling about it.

Some things to look for in the journaling…

  1. I unfolded the story, beginning with the dilemma/conflict (2nd paragraph) instead of a summation, in order to create enough suspense to draw you in.
  2. I varied the length and structure of the sentences. Compare each one to see how they are all different.
  3. I wrote with active verbs instead of passive ones.
  4. I drew a clear and specific picture of the action with my words.
  5. I shared a very human story to which we can all relate as fellow humans.

I believe we all have great stories to tell. We just don’t always know how to tell them in a way that draws others in. Next time you write a story for one of your layouts, write it on scratch paper first, and then look at each of the tips above to see how you do.

Don’t worry if your first attempt doesn’t impress you. That’s why we revise. Writing is a practice.

Shine On,
Love,-Noell

CHA 2012 – Stacy Julian Tells a CHA Big Picture Kinda Story and a Lovely Idea

I ran into Stacy Julian on the floor during the show and we started chatting. Well, you can’t talk to Stacy without having lots of fun and you can’t talk to her without her making you see things from a bigger point of view. So after she told me a story about being in the Basic Grey booth I asked her to tell it again to the camera so you all could hear it too! This story comes with a few cool ideas! Find the meaning!