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The Dynamic Line Flexible Template, Part 2 – Paperclipping 267

Wednesday, June 17th, 2015

What can you do with a single Flexible Template?

You can make an inexhaustible number of layouts that look very different.

But if I show you closeups of the template on two different pages, you might see that both layouts started from a single idea. Look below…



Do you see it? The idea that started each of these layouts is what I call the Dynamic Line Flexible Template.

I’ve used it a lot.

My Flexible Templates are not actually full templates for a page (such as a sketch). Each template is just a general design idea to get you started on a solid design foundation, but the details are all up to you and can vary with each page:

  • Photo count – use as many or few as your story needs.
  • Page count – single or double page layout…it’s up to you.
  • Page size – 6×8, 8.5×11, 12×12…the templates work with any size you can imagine.
  • Title placement – the size of your letters and the colors on your page play a major role in where a title will look best on any given page, so my templates don’t dictate title placement.
  • Papers – your own personal style and story will factor in where and how much you want to layer or not layer. The templates leave you free to be you.
  • Details – because you can take your layout is so many different directions with a Flexible Template, additional detailing, like embellishments, can vary just as much.

For example, on the first layout pictured above I used eleven different scraps and blocks of papers in layers on top of the background paper, whereas on the second layout I only used two. And on another page I made with this template, I didn’t add any layers of paper to the background at all.

In Part One of the Dynamic Line Flexible Template video I made two layouts with photos from the same event, with the same exact color scheme, and even most of the products were the same or from the same package.

Why would I do that? Because I wanted to show you how a few minor differences made the pages different enough.

So imagine what variety you can get by using different colors, products, and pictures from different events. That is what I demonstrated in this Part Two episode.

My Flexible Templates get you started on a page design (because starting can be the hardest part), but they give you as much flexibility and room for creativity as you want.

Design with Lines

Did you know that some lines will move your eye around the page quickly, while others give you a sense of slow, steady stability?

Lines are a big deal. They play a major role in how a person feels and where they look when viewing your pages.

Because line is an essential part of the Dynamic Line Flexible Template, I took this episode as an opportunity to demonstrate how to make these two very different types of lines, and to show you how those lines make you feel.

You must be a member to watch this very packed episode.

Click here to learn about a membership!

You will find the new video in the Member’s Area and on iTunes in the Member feed.

Shine On,

Writing for Better Story-Telling

Friday, June 5th, 2015

During this week’s Paperclipping Roundtable on better writing I promised to share a layout in order to illustrate the writing tips we shared (I captioned it below).

This is an older page. It’s not perfect, amazing, brilliant writing, but it tells a good story. And it’s not just a story about what happened at an event, but it illustrates Aiden as a toddler, and me as a protective mother of a three-year-old.

Little Rascal
Journaling directed to Aiden reads:

During one of Blake’s baseball practices an older boy, about 7 years old, challenged you to a race. You agreed and off you went.

Of course, we couldn’t expect your little legs to keep up with him and he hit the finish line with the declaration, “I won!” long before you did.

Here I was, your protective mother, irritated that this 7-year-old boy was gloating about beating you, my three-year-old.

But then you reached the finish-line, still at a full pace and with a huge smile on your face. You began yelling, “I won! I won! I won! I won!”


The boy tried his best to convince you (and the rest of us!) that he beat you. But he couldn’t overcome your boisterous “I won!” celebrations. He was frustrated.

And I have never stopped smiling about it.

Some things to look for in the journaling…

  1. I unfolded the story, beginning with the dilemma/conflict (2nd paragraph) instead of a summation, in order to create enough suspense to draw you in.
  2. I varied the length and structure of the sentences. Compare each one to see how they are all different.
  3. I wrote with active verbs instead of passive ones.
  4. I drew a clear and specific picture of the action with my words.
  5. I shared a very human story to which we can all relate as fellow humans.

I believe we all have great stories to tell. We just don’t always know how to tell them in a way that draws others in. Next time you write a story for one of your layouts, write it on scratch paper first, and then look at each of the tips above to see how you do.

Don’t worry if your first attempt doesn’t impress you. That’s why we revise. Writing is a practice.

Shine On,

The Dynamic Line Flexible Template – Paperclipping 266

Sunday, May 31st, 2015


Who’s ready for a new Flexible Template?

For those who are newer and don’t know what they are, Flexible Templates are the jumping off points I personally often use when starting a layout.

They are not as concrete as a sketch — they are purposely more vague to allow you creative play and tons of flexibility to meet whatever needs your photos demand.

Got one photo? Got ten photos? Most of the templates work will either way!

Rather than telling you where things should go, the Flexible Template provides you an abstract image to get you started, and then you take it from there, whether you’re working with a single photo or lots of photos.

Normally when I release a Flexible Template, I show you how totally varied your layouts from the same template can be by assembling pages on video. All of my resulting pages usually look so completely different that you’d never know they stemmed from the same idea.

But this week I felt like doing something different. I decided to show you how similar you can make your pages with the template, and still have enough variety in them that they’d look great together in the same album despite the similarities.

I used almost all the same products, or very similar products, and only varied a few details between the two pages, and I love how they look together in our Nutcracker album.

This video is in the Paperclipping Member Library and on iTunes.

Click here to learn about a membership!

Shine On,

P.S. I also shared in this video a tip I’m most proud of — one I’ve absolutely enjoyed using whenever I want to make a page with lots of flowery, fabric dimension. I do not like how flowers look in the page protector, and this tip solves that problem beautifully.

I shared this once before a few years back, but it’s always good to be reminded and to see it done with different supplies. Enjoy. :)

Four Ways to Use Up Your Letter Stickers – Paperclipping 265

Tuesday, May 26th, 2015


Don’t you hate it when your favorite package of letter stickers becomes practically unusable after creating only one or two pages with it, ever?

And sometimes it’s not just that it’s your favorite, but that the package is the one-and-only perfect match for the layout.

Sure, we all do our best to alter the remaining letters to make them look like the ones we need, but that only works so long, and then you’re left with a lot of letters you can’t really use.

So I’ve got four other solutions.

In the video I just made for Paperclipping Members, watch what I do to get more out of some of my favorite packs which, unfortunately, I made the mistake of only buying one of, each.

I’m pretty close to using all the letters, despite the fact that I consumed all the common ones right after I bought the darn things. Let me show you how you can do that, too, and start getting a lot more out of all your packages of stickers.

The video is in the Member Library and on iTunes.

Not a member? Click here for info!

Shine On,

Organization for Your Workflow – Paperclipping 263

Friday, April 24th, 2015

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Three questions for you…

  • How well do you know your scrapbooking process?
  • Do you know your process so well you’ve arranged your supplies and space in a way that facilitates it?
  • Does your setup help you flow through your scrapbooking, moving you along from one step to the next without much pausing to find or move things?

Click to read more…

The Alternate Destiny of a Scrapbook Page

Tuesday, April 14th, 2015

cutting_supplies_org 2

This page almost became something else.

Two weeks ago on the Paperclipping Roundtable, each panelist shared a scrapbook layout and I was going to share this one. But we ran out of time, and as the host of the show, that means I opted out of sharing.

Paperclipping Members got to actually watch me assemble this page start-to-finish, but what they did not know was that there was one major turning point in the middle that I did not share when this page almost spun in a wildly different direction.

To keep the video a reasonable length, I did not share that part of the process. Instead I was going to share it on the Paperclipping Roundtable.

But to keep the Roundtable a reasonable length, I had to cut that story yet again.

Since some of you asked, I decided to share that part of the story here.

Click to read more…

Organizing Cutting Supplies – Paperclipping 262

Monday, March 30th, 2015

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What is your biggest challenge when it comes to cutting supplies and organization?

For a lot of people, it’s how to store the extra leftover cuts you don’t end up using in a project.

Do you struggle with where to put them? Or do you have a place for them, but find they never get used?

Maybe your biggest problem is that the cutting tools pull you out of your flow, so you don’t even use them much. Do you find that you neglect your electronic cutting machine, or your die cutting machine?

The reason could simply be that the location of these machines and their supplies breaks up your workflow.

So what is it for you?

When it comes to punches, die cutters and their dies, electronic cutters and their accessories, and all other related supplies including the leftover cut pieces, which of these gives you troubles?

Leave a comment and let us know!

Then if you’re a Member you can watch the episode we just released this morning that shows how I set up the cutting area of my scraproom. You’ll see how it supports my workflow, and you’ll see what I do with my leftovers.

Lastly, you’ll see me assemble the layout in the image above as I share lots of design tips for creating a unified page.

Are you not yet a member? Please CLICK HERE to learn about a Paperclipping membership.

Organizing Embellishments – Paperclipping 261

Friday, March 27th, 2015

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How long does it take you to choose the items you use on a page?

Someone recently used the word, “audition” to describe their long drawn-out process of picking and choosing items to use. That is a fitting word for the task of looking at lots of possibilities until you finally find that right one.

I’ve almost eliminated the audition process.

Only once in a while do I need to spend even five minutes “auditioning.” Now I just play and create.

And on top of that I have very little cleanup time because of my setup and process.

Really, it is an absolute dream.

I want to share it with you, and today I’m specifically sharing how I’ve organized my embellishments.

Here are five things you can do to make it easier to choose and then put away embellishments:

  1. Sort your items by the categories you regularly search for.
    Some of the categories of items I regularly search for are red items; flourish items for a ballet album; bright and sunny items for outdoors Arizona pages; neutral items; brand new stuff; love-related items for relationship stories; house-related items; enamel dots; etc).
  2. Store your items by these categories you’ve identified.
    If you’re always looking for mint-colored items and it takes you more than a minute to find and gather them, it makes sense to have a store of mint items waiting for you. But that doesn’t mean you must also have containers for every other color — it would be unhelpful to have a store of items in a category you don’t tend to look for. You will rarely or never end up using those.
  3. Eliminate a category once you stop going to it.
    Believe it or not, at some point you will no longer be looking for mint-colored items, or enamel dots, or embellishments that will look good on ballet pages. Once a category is no longer serving you and you find you’re not looking for items that way anymore, take those items and divide them up among your other stores of embellishments.
  4. Eliminate the overwhelm of too much stuff by categorizing.
    Grab only one or two of these stored categories when you’re scrapbooking and bring them to your table. This will allow you to keep a decent sized stash overall, but give you the benefit of having fewer items to choose from. Too many choices leads to cognitive dissonance and overwhelm, which stop creativity.
  5. If an item sits unused too long, re-categorize it and store it in one of your other spots.
    By dividing your embellishments into categories, you can choose to re-categorize any items that aren’t getting used. I find that just by re-categorizing something and storing it in a different way, I breathe new life into that item.

This has made the process so fast for me.

You have to see it to believe it.

And you can, because we just shot a video that shows me using a lot of different embellishments on one page without the “audition” time of trying to pick and choose what will work best. I share even more tips and solutions to share on the video, too.

Plus, my table was clean when I was done. I just had a few containers to slip back into place and my table was clean and ready for the next page within a single minute.

But you need a Paperclipping Membership to watch the video.

It’s in the Member’s Area now. CLICK HERE to learn about a membership.

Shine On,

Organization for Mixed Media – Paperclipping 260

Thursday, March 12th, 2015

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Today we dive into four of my cube drawers, a basket, and a shelf to see how I organize and store all of my mixed media supplies (minus the organization of stamp-related supplies).

We also look at how I situated my entire mixed-media area to work together, including this cabinet of cubes, my painting easel, and my mixed-media scrapbooking table.

stamping 1 (2)

And lastly, we see how fast, easy, and convenient it is to find and gather the supplies and use them on a scrapbooking page. Because it really doesn’t matter if your room is beautiful and looks organized if it does not make your process flow.

Our spaces should help us create more.

stamping 7

This video is for Paperclipping Members. You’ll find it in the Member’s Area and on iTunes.

Not a member?

Check out why this is just one of 260 videos that could enhance and support your scrapbooking life!

CLICK HERE for info about a membership. :)

Shine On,

Paperclipping 259 – Organization for Stamp-Related Supplies

Monday, March 2nd, 2015

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In this today’s episode I show you how I organize all of my supplies related to stamping — including specialty papers, embossing supplies, Perfect Pearls, Stickles, and much, much more.

You’ll also see how this assists in my process as I scrapbook a layout from these supplies.


Come away with three big general organization concepts that will benefit anyone, and lot of specific organization ideas for supplies you might have.

The video is available now in the Member’s Area and on iTunes for Members only.

Not a member? Why the heck not? ;)

Check out membership information here.

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Shine On,