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Posts Tagged ‘design principles’

Leading and Anchoring, Part 2 – Paperclipping 288

Thursday, April 28th, 2016

A Growing Hobby

My focus for April’s member videos has been to tackle two common layout problems:

  1. A lack of focus or direction for the viewer.
  2. Awkardness of the items on the page.

Lack of Focus

Believe it or not, if we as artists or designers do not direct where a person should look when viewing our layouts, then most people won’t bother to look for more than a second or two! Without guidance that is hidden within the design, the eye will tend to wander off the page with nothing compelling it to come back. Or worse, the lack of direction will translate as confusing — as having too many items competing for your attention.

The result? A lack of interest in our page.

Our lazy brains just do not want to bother dealing with multiple items competing for our attention.

Awkwardness

And if we don’t anchor the items we put on our pages — yes, even when we’re going for a random look — we end up with pages that feel as awkward as most of us were at age twelve and thirteen.

Design Ideas that Lead and Anchor

By the time you’ve watched both Part 1 and Part 2 of the Leading and Anchoring episodes I made for April, you will have four totally different layout templates that you can use and make your own.

These page ideas have leading and anchoring already built in, so it’s a great way to practice these design concepts.

The photos in this post are sneak peeks of the designs for Part 2.

Paperclipping Members can login now to the Member’s Area or go to iTunes to watch Part 2 (and I hope you’ll give these ideas a try!).

CLICK HERE to learn about a membership!

P.S.> Here’s what to do if your membership expired:

  1. Go to http://members.izzyvideo.com/amember/member.php
  2. Login.
  3. Click – Add/Renew Subscriptions.
  4. In the Membership Type drop-down window choose Paperclipping
    1-year renewal for $28.

Enjoy!
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Leading and Anchoring – Paperclipping 287

Wednesday, April 20th, 2016

Big, Sweet Welcome Home closeup
In need of a layout idea to try?

This week I picked two design principles and made them the crux of my scrapbook pages.

Any time you’ve run out of ideas you can pick a design principle and let it inspire the direction of your page.

Not only can this get you moving forward on a layout, but it can also be a great way to practice or explore the design principle.

So my tip today is: Pick a design principle and use it to jump start and inspire your design.

Friends From the Stage closeup
The last time I did this I chose the principle of harmony, and in the process I learned more about my own taste and visual preferences.

This time I chose two principles — leading the eye and anchoring — and combined them to make the main design elements of both of the pages I scrapbooked in the newest Paperclipping video. I then showed (in the video) comparisons to other pages where those principles were used more subtly, or where I took the complete opposite approach.

The 6 total layouts I featured in the video show you just a sampling of how versatile design is. And that’s just one reason why design is so super cool.

So, do you want to try this design principle exploration?

You can choose your own design principle to focus on today, or you can watch my video and go with the design principles I chose. You can scraplift my layouts, or you can use the principles and the ideas to inspire your own design.

You must have an active Paperclipping Membership to watch the video.

CLICK HERE for info about a membership.

Shine On and have fun paperclipping!

Elements and Shape – Paperclipping 284

Monday, February 29th, 2016

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After two injuries took me off my feet for a combined total of 12 months, my clothes fit me differently now. A few pieces, thankfully, fit me better and give me a decent shape. Many of my favorite pieces no longer fit so well and make my shape look…bulgy. =)

So I’ve been having a shape-adventure, learning which styles of clothing give me a nice shape now.

Shape works exactly like this in design and scrapbooking.

Yes, we add shapes to our pages in the supplies we use, we sometimes divide our pages into shapes such as rectangles, but do we intentionally think in terms of creating shape on the page, the way our clothing creates and changes the way our shape looks?

Shape seems like a simple subject — rectangles, triangles, circles, etc.

We know that as scrapbookers we use supplies that are in these and other shapes.

But there is an additional way to use shape, and that other way, for me, is the key for getting most of my compositions to work. I’m always thinking in terms of creating shape with the items I’m adding to my pages.

Not adding shapes, but creating shape.

Two separate things.

Click to read more…

Flipped-Mirror Design Idea – Paperclipping 281

Thursday, January 21st, 2016

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Sometimes getting started is the hardest part.

Quite often I start with a design concept already in mind. I have an arsenal of design concepts that I pull from when I sit down to scrapbook, and they’re the same concepts I demonstrate in my videos when I share a specific design idea or a Flexible Template.

For me, these design concepts just sit in my head as imagery and they seem to take turns pushing themselves to the forefront of my mind so that when I sit down to scrapbook, there’s usually an idea that wants to try its hand on my new page.

I name these ideas when I share them with you so that you can easily add them to your own arsenal.

You can…

  1. Store them in your head and trust that they’ll periodically surface, like I do.
  2. Write them down in a notebook (with words or drawings).
  3. Login to your Paperclipping Membership and jog your memory by looking at the names of the videos (because I always name the videos by the name I’ve given to a design concept).

However you store them, I do recommend having set design concepts to draw from. You can save yourself many hours and much frustration if you’re drawing from a store of ideas, rather than having to start from scratch or get lost looking through Pinterest every time you want to scrapbook.

Are you ready for a new idea to play with?

Today’s design concept — the Flipped-Mirror — can be used to enhance your photo or your title, can be the starting point for the rest of your design.

You must be a Paperclipping Member to access the video.

CLICK HERE for info about a membership.

Shine On,
Love,-Noell

Create Layout Designs From Scraps – Paperclipping 272

Thursday, August 27th, 2015

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Would you sometimes love to scrapbook mindlessly?

No thinking, just doing?

Well, I can’t promise NO thinking, but I can suggest a way to do very little of it for the ultimate in scrapbooking relaxation.

It also involves using your scraps, so this method will give you more use out of your favorite papers, in addition to a cushier, more self-replenishing scrap experience.

Imagine sitting down and simply pulling from the top of a pile of scraps to create beautiful layers with lots of different patterns and colors you love…which sums up this method that I want to share with you today.

I demonstrated it twice with two scrapbook pages in today’s new Paperclipping video. You’ll get all the different tips you need to build a layout from scraps with very little taxing of the brain for ideas.

The video is waiting for you in the Member’s Area and on iTunes.

If you’re not a member, please click here to see how easy it is to get started!
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Repetition Do’s and Don’ts – Paperclipping 270

Thursday, July 30th, 2015

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Want to master a design principle?

Repetition is one of the key ways to creating a feeling of harmony in your layouts. But there are some things to watch for.

In the newest video tutorial of Paperclipping I shared some Do’s and Don’ts for how to use repetition in several different ways without making the page monotonous.

I shared two older pages — one that demonstrated a “Don’t,” and another that is definitely a “Do,” as well as a good example of how to fix the problem of the first page.

Then I assembled two more pages, working with those Do’s and Don’ts of repetition until my pages had a feeling of harmony.

See the sneak peek above?

Does it feel harmonious to you?

See how to do it in this newest episode of Paperclipping!

Note: You must be a Paperclipping Member to watch this video.

CLICK HERE to learn about our membership. =)

How to Pick and Mix Products for Kits – Paperclipping 269

Tuesday, July 14th, 2015

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Would you love to be able to mix patterns together into an awesome-looking coordinated group?

Whether you want to mix patterns for a single layout, or as a kit that will coordinate an entire scrapbook album, there are things you should understand about color…

Three Important Things to Understand About Color

A single hue can have many different versions. There are three things that decide how a single hue, such yellow, will actually look. Knowing what these are can help you better understand how to mix and use color.

1. Tonality (tone) – Tone refers to how light or dark a color is. Color is made lighter with white and darker with black. The paper on the far left with the lines of triangles shows a variety of tonalities of the same colors (turquoise, green, and yellow):
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See the different versions of yellow? They are the same yellow except in terms of their tone, which changes from light to dark. Same with the turquoise and green.

It’s easy to mix a variety of tones of the same color in your kits without running into any matching difficulties. In fact, variation in tonality is a really good idea, so go ahead and mix lights and darks of the same color.

2) Temperature – The temperature of a color depends on how warm or cool it is, which depends on how much yellow or blue has been blended into it. The pink and mustard stripe on the left in this picture below is very warm. The paper with the spokes on the right is cooler (though not totally cold because it has both warms and cools).
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We typically say the warm colors are red, orange, and yellow, and the cool colors are green, blue, and purple, but that is not entirely correct. You can actually get warmer and cooler versions of every color. It is okay to have some cools and some warms together in a single kit, but it’s a little trickier than mixing a variety of tones.

3) Vibrancy – Vibrancy has to do with how bright or muted a color is. It is very hard to mix vibrancy within a color grouping and get it right, so if you are newer at color, it’s easier to stick with colors of the same vibrancy.

The spokes in the paper above are very vibrant, but the blue background is muted. They work well together because their temperatures are similar. The muted blue works well with that tiny bit of eggplant just to the left of it because they have a similar vibrancy and their temperature is not too different. Their tones are very different from each other — remember, it’s good to have a variety of tones.

But the paper with the spokes and the paper with the pink and mustard stripes are horrible together. They have very little in common — their vibrancy is opposite, their temperatures are different. There just aren’t enough similarities to unite them.

It is possible to have both muted and bright colors within a group (as you can see that it works in the paper with the vibrant spokes but muted background color), and the sooner you master temperature, the sooner you’ll be able to mix vibrancy well.

Most Common Color Problems

When scrapbookers come to me with color challenges on their layouts, the most common problem I see is vibrancy mixes that don’t work. The second most common problem is that the colors are not balanced across the page.

You learn it by seeing it.

  • Would you like to see me take a big mix of papers from different designers and different years and put them together into a beautiful and exciting kit?
  • Want to see examples of papers that work well together and papers that don’t?
  • Do you want tips for making the process easier?
  • Would it help you to see me create a style-vibe for a kit?

Today we released a new video that takes you through my process of making a coordinated kit for an entire album. You’ll not only see these color principles at work, but you’ll also see the inspiration behind achieving a specific style with variety. You’ll see pattern-mixing, choosing or eliminating papers, and you’ll see me assemble a layout from the new kit.
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This video is for Paperclipping Members and is available the Member’s Area.

CLICK HERE for information about a membership!

Shine On,
Love,-Noell

Not Too Big, Not Too Small, Just Right – Paperclipping 268

Tuesday, June 30th, 2015

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Did you know that a slight size adjustment in your decorative items can make the difference between a page that looks finished and harmonious, and a page that doesn’t quite?

  • If an important embellishment is slightly big, it overpowers our photos and makes the page fill crammed and lacking breathing room.
  • If it’s too small, the page feels awkward and unfinished. The items on the page look disconnected and seem to be floating.

To show the difference size can make, and to help you identify when something is even just a little too small or big, I made multiple cuts of embellishments with my Cameo and compared them on pages I was making so you can actually see the difference between items that are just right, and items that aren’t up to size.

Hopefully by seeing these comparisons you will feel more empowered as you lay out your pages.

We uploaded this video tutorial to the Member’s Area an on iTunes today.

If you’re not a member, CLICK HERE for info!

Shine On,
Love,-Noell
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The Dynamic Line Flexible Template, Part 2 – Paperclipping 267

Wednesday, June 17th, 2015

What can you do with a single Flexible Template?

You can make an inexhaustible number of layouts that look very different.

But if I show you closeups of the template on two different pages, you might see that both layouts started from a single idea. Look below…

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Do you see it? The idea that started each of these layouts is what I call the Dynamic Line Flexible Template.

I’ve used it a lot.

My Flexible Templates are not actually full templates for a page (such as a sketch). Each template is just a general design idea to get you started on a solid design foundation, but the details are all up to you and can vary with each page:

  • Photo count – use as many or few as your story needs.
  • Page count – single or double page layout…it’s up to you.
  • Page size – 6×8, 8.5×11, 12×12…the templates work with any size you can imagine.
  • Title placement – the size of your letters and the colors on your page play a major role in where a title will look best on any given page, so my templates don’t dictate title placement.
  • Papers – your own personal style and story will factor in where and how much you want to layer or not layer. The templates leave you free to be you.
  • Details – because you can take your layout is so many different directions with a Flexible Template, additional detailing, like embellishments, can vary just as much.

For example, on the first layout pictured above I used eleven different scraps and blocks of papers in layers on top of the background paper, whereas on the second layout I only used two. And on another page I made with this template, I didn’t add any layers of paper to the background at all.

In Part One of the Dynamic Line Flexible Template video I made two layouts with photos from the same event, with the same exact color scheme, and even most of the products were the same or from the same package.

Why would I do that? Because I wanted to show you how a few minor differences made the pages different enough.

So imagine what variety you can get by using different colors, products, and pictures from different events. That is what I demonstrated in this Part Two episode.

My Flexible Templates get you started on a page design (because starting can be the hardest part), but they give you as much flexibility and room for creativity as you want.

Design with Lines

Did you know that some lines will move your eye around the page quickly, while others give you a sense of slow, steady stability?

Lines are a big deal. They play a major role in how a person feels and where they look when viewing your pages.

Because line is an essential part of the Dynamic Line Flexible Template, I took this episode as an opportunity to demonstrate how to make these two very different types of lines, and to show you how those lines make you feel.

You must be a member to watch this very packed episode.

Click here to learn about a membership!

You will find the new video in the Member’s Area and on iTunes in the Member feed.

Shine On,
Love,-Noell

Diagonal Designs – Paperclipping 241

Tuesday, May 27th, 2014

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Have you been noticing diagonal, or angled, layouts recently?

I’ve noticed a few.

It’s a small trend that’s had a resurgence. It won’t be a big trend. It’s more like a little bump. But it’s fun to shake things up and do something different than you normally would. So I did three layouts where the designs are all tilted at an angle. I love all but one of them.

What’s wrong with the one?

Actually, I mostly love it. If I had set it straight instead of angled, it would be close to perfect for me, but it’s the angle that is bothering, and it solidified what I already believed…

When making diagonal layouts, the elements on your page should follow the diagonal line from end to end.

Your items need to emphasize the diagonal.

I knew this at the start, but when it came time for me to do this third layout, the items I wanted to use worked better by circling the focal point photo — not following the diagonal and not extending end to end.

Here’s a closeup of the way my items circled the main photo, as opposed to they way the emphasize the diagonal in the layout above.

Diagonal_Designs 2

What happens to a diagonal layout when the items do not reach end to end, nor form a line (including loose, implied lines) in the direction of the diagonal? Your diagonal line is weak, so it looks like you accidentally placed things crooked.

The layout I show in the image at the top of of post totally works, even though the items don’t form a strong obvious line. The line is loose and implied because I used lots of little items instead of of a strong clean line, but it is still a definite line, so it works to make a clear diagonal.

For the layout that didn’t work, I normally would have changed my design idea and made my elements straight instead of diagonal, but since I was finishing up a layout for a video on diagonal design, I gave the diagonal a shot, and failed just a little. :)

Here’s what I learned a day later when I took a second look, on top of what I already knew about diagonals: If your items aren’t emphasizing the diagonal by following the angled line, then they compete with the angle. This means your angle is watered down, and it looks crooked instead of purposely diagonal.

Are you a visual person who wants to see it in action?

You can see me put together all 3 layouts, beginning to end, in a video I just added to the membership library.

You’ll need to have your membership to get into the library or to get the video from iTunes.

Click here to start your Paperclipping Membership!

Are you ready to try a diagonally designed layout yourself?

Shine On,
Love,-Noell