Tag Archives: color theory

Three Products to Help You Harmonize Your Pages

IMG_5182

When I was a girl I fell in love.

I was coloring a page with ocean waters in my coloring book. Instead of using one blue for the sea, I decided to try a mix of blue with aqua. That successful experiment taught me the power of harmonious color schemes. It taught me my favorite way to use color. I’ve been in love with this kind of color palette ever since.

Two kinds of color variety that will harmonize your pages:

  1. Monochromatic: a mix of lighter and darker or warmer and cooler versions of the same color.
  2. Analogous: a mix of two or three colors that are next to each other on the color wheel.

Here are 3 delicious products I’ve been using lately because they give me a perfect amount of subtle color changes, creating a harmonious feeling of movement and flow…

1. A Product to Harmonize Your Title

color_harmony2
Amy Tangerine’s Transparent Letter Stickers from the Yes, Please Collection: Each color comes in two tones, and the transparent quality helps them to blend with your background better, too.

How to use it to get harmony: Use both the light and the dark version within your title, like I did with light letters for “Monsoon” and dark letters for “Season.”

IMG_5026
Don’t mix it up though, meaning don’t mix light and dark every other letter, or with light popping up sporadically between dark letters. For the flowing harmonious movement we’re talking about, you want the color changes to graduate subtly. Start with one version of the color for part of the way, then finish with the other version.

2. A Product to Harmonize Your Patterns and Embellishments

color_harmony3
Amy Tangerine’s entire Rise and Shine Collection: The collection as a whole has lots of different colors around the wheel, but within that collection are patterned papers that wrote the harmonious color schemes playbook with their mixes of tones or analogous hues. And then there is the Transparent Sticker sheet that is my favorite collection of stickers of all time. The image in the link does not show the vibrancy of color that it actually is. You can see it a little more by the doodled “sunset” I added between “AZ” and “Monsoon” in the layout image above.

How to use it: For a super harmonious layout, pick from the papers an analogous color scheme of 2-3 colors as your dominant palette. Then if you want, just add touches of an accent color that is from somewhere else on the color wheel.

And don’t forget the epoxy stickers, one of which I used below…

sunset
…which brings us to the most amazing ink pads ever.

3. A Product to Harmonize Your Stamping

color_harmony

Ombre Ink Pads by Hero Arts: These gorgeous ombre inks blend analogous colors for you!

They come in Mint to Green, Red to Ruby, Pink to Red, Butter to Orange, Pool to Navy, Grey to Black, and Lime to Forest Green.

I’m just waiting for them to come up with Orchid to Purple. Oh, hey…I just came up with it for them! Wouldn’t that be a gorgeous addition to these harmonious beauties?

How to use it: Be sure to rotate your stamp a little as you pounce it into the ink so you the different colors blend. Otherwise you’ll have a line between each one.

You can see the Butter to Orange in the sun rays above (I added a bit of Scattered Straw yellow to the bottom) and on this cute fox below, with just a little bit of line between the yellow and yellow-orange. Oops, don’t forget to rotate that stamp sightly as you pounce!

scrapbook_letterstickers3

And now you have one key to creating harmony on your layouts!

Get Even More Harmonious

There are other ways to get harmony and unity in your pages. I’m doing a whole class presentation on this called, “Scrapbookers, Unite!” at the upcoming True Scrap event, hosted by Lain Ehmann. For the next few days you can get a half off the sales price.

SIGN UP NOW before the the early bird registration discount go away!

Click here for all the info you need about True Scrap, including a description of my class and the other classes you’ll get to attend!

Hyman Sneak

TS7 Class collage with title

Don’t forget, the 50% early bird discount will go away on the last day of September. Don’t procrastinate and miss out! Click here for info.

(All links are affiliate).

How to Pick and Mix Products for Kits – Paperclipping 269

mixing_patterns2
Would you love to be able to mix patterns together into an awesome-looking coordinated group?

Whether you want to mix patterns for a single layout, or as a kit that will coordinate an entire scrapbook album, there are things you should understand about color…

Three Important Things to Understand About Color

A single hue can have many different versions. There are three things that decide how a single hue, such yellow, will actually look. Knowing what these are can help you better understand how to mix and use color.

1. Tonality (tone) – Tone refers to how light or dark a color is. Color is made lighter with white and darker with black. The paper on the far left with the lines of triangles shows a variety of tonalities of the same colors (turquoise, green, and yellow):
mixing_patterns1
See the different versions of yellow? They are the same yellow except in terms of their tone, which changes from light to dark. Same with the turquoise and green.

It’s easy to mix a variety of tones of the same color in your kits without running into any matching difficulties. In fact, variation in tonality is a really good idea, so go ahead and mix lights and darks of the same color.

2) Temperature – The temperature of a color depends on how warm or cool it is, which depends on how much yellow or blue has been blended into it. The pink and mustard stripe on the left in this picture below is very warm. The paper with the spokes on the right is cooler (though not totally cold because it has both warms and cools).
mixing_patterns3
We typically say the warm colors are red, orange, and yellow, and the cool colors are green, blue, and purple, but that is not entirely correct. You can actually get warmer and cooler versions of every color. It is okay to have some cools and some warms together in a single kit, but it’s a little trickier than mixing a variety of tones.

3) Vibrancy – Vibrancy has to do with how bright or muted a color is. It is very hard to mix vibrancy within a color grouping and get it right, so if you are newer at color, it’s easier to stick with colors of the same vibrancy.

The spokes in the paper above are very vibrant, but the blue background is muted. They work well together because their temperatures are similar. The muted blue works well with that tiny bit of eggplant just to the left of it because they have a similar vibrancy and their temperature is not too different. Their tones are very different from each other — remember, it’s good to have a variety of tones.

But the paper with the spokes and the paper with the pink and mustard stripes are horrible together. They have very little in common — their vibrancy is opposite, their temperatures are different. There just aren’t enough similarities to unite them.

It is possible to have both muted and bright colors within a group (as you can see that it works in the paper with the vibrant spokes but muted background color), and the sooner you master temperature, the sooner you’ll be able to mix vibrancy well.

Most Common Color Problems

When scrapbookers come to me with color challenges on their layouts, the most common problem I see is vibrancy mixes that don’t work. The second most common problem is that the colors are not balanced across the page.

You learn it by seeing it.

  • Would you like to see me take a big mix of papers from different designers and different years and put them together into a beautiful and exciting kit?
  • Want to see examples of papers that work well together and papers that don’t?
  • Do you want tips for making the process easier?
  • Would it help you to see me create a style-vibe for a kit?

Today we released a new video that takes you through my process of making a coordinated kit for an entire album. You’ll not only see these color principles at work, but you’ll also see the inspiration behind achieving a specific style with variety. You’ll see pattern-mixing, choosing or eliminating papers, and you’ll see me assemble a layout from the new kit.
mixing_patterns5
This video is for Paperclipping Members and is available the Member’s Area.

CLICK HERE for information about a membership!

Shine On,
Love,-Noell

Ideas for Radiant Orchid, Part 2 – Paperclipping 232

paperclipping 232

What’s the big deal about Pantone’s Radiant Orchid?

It’s just lavender, right?

Well, not really. From what I understand of lavender, it is a whiter version of pure purple. Pure purple is a balanced mix of blue and red. Lavender is a simple color.

Orchid, on the other hand, is more complex. What does that mean? Somewhere along the way, either during the mixing of purple, or after the purple was already mixed, pink and fuchsia are blended into it.

Complex colors draw us in more because there is so much to discover about them. It takes longer for the eye to see and register their nuances. They’re also more interesting to combine with other colors because each color you pair with a complex color will enhance and emphasize a different “ingredient” of that color.

In terms of trends, Radiant Orchid is styling this year! Before Pantone announced its color choice to represent the current thought, ideas, and desires of our culture, fashion experts predicted pink as a hot trendy color for 2014. Orchid, with its infusion of pink and fuchsia, is just the right type of purple to hit the scene.

Radiant Orchid and Color Temperature

Complex colors can be easier to mix and match with different color temperatures because there is bigger mix of warm and cool within them.

In Ideas for Radiant Orchid, Part 1 I shared a cool color combination, and then showed how you can take that same group of colors, but go darker and more vibrant with it.

In today’s episode, Ideas for Radiant Orchid, Part 2, we go warm with orchid. I share one combination that is darker and vibrant and on the cooler spectrum of warms. Then we move into a softer muted palette that is far warmer.

Watching both episodes should help you see how many directions you can take a single color. Especially when you consider all the other colors I DIDN’T use that we could still pair with Radiant Orchid.

In Part 2 I also share some super fun techniques that will give you brilliant results! If you’re a Paperclipping Member you can watch this video now in the Member’s Area or on iTunes.

Not a member? Click here for information!