Organizing Embellishments – Paperclipping 261

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How long does it take you to choose the items you use on a page?

Someone recently used the word, “audition” to describe their long drawn-out process of picking and choosing items to use. That is a fitting word for the task of looking at lots of possibilities until you finally find that right one.

I’ve almost eliminated the audition process.

Only once in a while do I need to spend even five minutes “auditioning.” Now I just play and create.

And on top of that I have very little cleanup time because of my setup and process.

Really, it is an absolute dream.

I want to share it with you, and today I’m specifically sharing how I’ve organized my embellishments.

Here are five things you can do to make it easier to choose and then put away embellishments:

  1. Sort your items by the categories you regularly search for.
    Some of the categories of items I regularly search for are red items; flourish items for a ballet album; bright and sunny items for outdoors Arizona pages; neutral items; brand new stuff; love-related items for relationship stories; house-related items; enamel dots; etc).
  2. Store your items by these categories you’ve identified.
    If you’re always looking for mint-colored items and it takes you more than a minute to find and gather them, it makes sense to have a store of mint items waiting for you. But that doesn’t mean you must also have containers for every other color — it would be unhelpful to have a store of items in a category you don’t tend to look for. You will rarely or never end up using those.
  3. Eliminate a category once you stop going to it.
    Believe it or not, at some point you will no longer be looking for mint-colored items, or enamel dots, or embellishments that will look good on ballet pages. Once a category is no longer serving you and you find you’re not looking for items that way anymore, take those items and divide them up among your other stores of embellishments.
  4. Eliminate the overwhelm of too much stuff by categorizing.
    Grab only one or two of these stored categories when you’re scrapbooking and bring them to your table. This will allow you to keep a decent sized stash overall, but give you the benefit of having fewer items to choose from. Too many choices leads to cognitive dissonance and overwhelm, which stop creativity.
  5. If an item sits unused too long, re-categorize it and store it in one of your other spots.
    By dividing your embellishments into categories, you can choose to re-categorize any items that aren’t getting used. I find that just by re-categorizing something and storing it in a different way, I breathe new life into that item.

This has made the process so fast for me.

You have to see it to believe it.

And you can, because we just shot a video that shows me using a lot of different embellishments on one page without the “audition” time of trying to pick and choose what will work best. I share even more tips and solutions to share on the video, too.

Plus, my table was clean when I was done. I just had a few containers to slip back into place and my table was clean and ready for the next page within a single minute.

But you need a Paperclipping Membership to watch the video.

It’s in the Member’s Area now. CLICK HERE to learn about a membership.

Shine On,
Love,-Noell

  • Tina Campbell

    Fantastic video :) I struggle with this type of thing to organize but I’m getting better with it and I like your ideas and that cube that organized a little bit of everything by item :)

  • Gabrielle McCann

    Really great post – I like the idea of changing if something no longer works for you – I need to give myself permission to do this

  • Jeanette Giancaspro

    I, too, like the suggestion of changing the category of items you no longer “go to.” I’m going to do that with flowers. I just don’t seem to look for “flowers,” but I might use them if they were in my stash with other similar embellishments. Thanks for the idea!